The Impressment Gang


Volume I Issue II  •  November 2014


 
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Contributors' Notes

 

ANNE BALDO is a former student at the University of Windsor, previously published in Existere, Carousel, Lichen, and Contemporary Verse 2.

NICOLAS BILLON’s work has been produced in Toronto, Stratford, Vancouver, New York and Paris. His book of three plays Fault Lines: Greenland –Iceland – Faroe Islands won the 2013 Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama. He recently adapted his first play, The Elephant Song, into a feature film. Nicolas grew up in Montreal and now lives in Toronto.

JAMES CEDARHILL is a poet living in Toronto. He works too much, and doesn’t write as much as he would like. When he does set his mind to writing, it often lands in and around the concept of space: suburbs, cities, dreams, and the lonely people that inhabit them. He also plays hockey, and struggles with a baseball obsession.

STEPHEN CHOI studied English Literature at Saint Mary’s University. He began writing fiction after reading Virginia Woolf ’s “Mrs Dalloway” in class and feeling the vast possibilities of literary expression. He is currently living in London, Ontario and has very little idea where he will end up in the future.

ALYSON HARDWICK is a Halifax photographer who has been writing in a journal since 2002.

ALAN HILL was born in the South West of England near the Welsh border. After leaving school at sixteen, he travelled extensively and worked in jobs ranging from renovating old graveyards to working in a jellybean factory before eventually studying at the University of Leeds. Since 2005, Alan has been living in Canada after meeting his Vietnamese-Canadian wife to be while working in Botswana. Alan Hill has been previously published in North America in CV2, Canadian Literature, Vancouver Review, Antigonish Review, Sub-Terrain, Poetry is Dead, Quills, Cascadia Review, Reunion- The Dallas Review and in a number of anthologies and in the United Kingdom in South, The Wolf, Brittle Star and Turbulence. His second full collection, The Broken Word (Silver-Bow Press), was published in mid 2013. He is a regular reader of poetry at readings in Vancouver and has appeared at both ‘Word on The Street’ and ‘Summer Dreams’ literary festivals. More on Alan can be found at: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/AlanHill.

DESIREE JUNG has a background in journalism, film, creative writing, and comparative literature. She has published translations, fiction and poetry in Exile, The Dirty Goat, Modern Poetry in Translation, The Antigonish Review, The Haro, The Literary Yard, Black Bottom Review, Gravel Magazine, Tree House, Bricolage, Hamilton Stone Review, Ijagun Poetry Journal, Scapegoat Review, Storyalicious, Perceptions, Loading Zone, and others. For more information see her website: www.desireejung.com.

MATEA KULIĆ is a writer and literacy tutor living in Vancouver. The rhythm in language instructs her poetry. Her work has been published in The Capilano Review, RicePaper, Emerge and The Maynard Review among others. She studied under the mentorship of poet Jen Currin at Simon Fraser University’s Writer’s Studio. Between work and writing, she makes time for swimming.

WINONA LINN is a Canadian poet, performer, teacher and spoken word artist. Linn was the 2011 poet laureate of the Federal Green Party of Canada, and wrote and performed poems on a variety of issues for the duration of the 2011 federal election. In the spring of 2013, a collection of Linn’s poems was published by Paisley Chapbook Press out of Halifax, Nova Scotia. This collection, entitled Stand Tall, was a collaboration with visual artist Sidney Robichaud and is available for sale across Canada. Linn has been published in multiple journals including The Philistine, Lantern, and Maple Tree Literary Supplement. Currently, Winona Linn lives in Paris, France where she teaches poetry to children.

MARK JORDAN MANNER is currently completing his MFA in creative writing at the University of Guelph. His stories have appeared in Grain, Prairie Fire, EVENT, The Antigonish Review, The Dalhousie Review, and others. He lives in Toronto.

DAWNA GALLAGHER MOORE is known for her cryptic, witty, and pointed cartoons which challenge or “send-up” clichéd modern responses to thorny issues or social encounters. Dawna has a BFA and MFA from NSCAD University and studied at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She was a recipient of Canada Council visual art grants and the Brucebo Canadian-Scandinavian Foundation scholarship for landscape painting. Her humorous sketches have appeared in publications in Ottawa, Halifax, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, and New York. Although her desk is often messy, she can always find her pen and paper.

THOMAS O’CONNELL is a librarian living on the shores of the Hudson River in Beacon, NY. His poetry and short fiction has appeared in Caketrain, NANO Fiction, and The Los Angeles Review, as well as other print and online journals.

MARIE SOLIS is your average twentysomething year old who, by day, works as a Quality Assurance employee who religiously follows strict protocol and guidelines for a company that does logistics for clinical trials around the world. By night, she lies down in bed and writes stories on the fly. Sometimes she attempts bad poetry (though you will not be getting any bad poetry from her). Either way, to hell with protocol.

BEN STEPHENSON is the author of the novel, A Matter of Life and Death Or Something (Douglas & McIntyre, 2012). It was longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin award, and CBC Books named him one of “10 Canadian Writers to Watch.” He is currently living in Toronto and working on something else.

ANNE WHITE has been writing stuff since high school, and is finally trying to share some of it. She thinks mostly in poems but once in a while a short story pops into her head. She hopes to cultivate a more regular writing practice and maybe even call herself a writer one day. And she’s reading a lot of W.H. Auden right now.

 

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